Revolutionary Education. Inspired by Women.


Winners of the
Social Innovation Challenge

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Sponsored by

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Partnered with

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Recipients of the

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At Leesta, we help children develop empathy and cultural competence by bringing women to the forefront of U.S. history education. Our team designs online interactive resources for 3rd-5th graders that engage them in new narratives of U.S. history — ones that are inspired by women!


The name Leesta is a phonetic play on the Spanish word “lista”, which means a smart or clever girl!








In the United States almost half of the population of children identify as girls. How can we expect students to relate or be inspired by the history lessons they are being taught if they cannot see themselves in it?





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It is not that there weren’t interesting and diverse women doing amazing things throughout history, they are just being left out of the story!








We are Creating High Quality
Supplementary Educational Materials

Our team is designing a set of modules. Each one will focus on the life of one woman but will tell a larger narrative of American history along the way. Each module will contain a short written bio, lesson plans, accompanying activities, and the game.

The Game

The game is the core of Leesta’s resources, which allows children to experience the lives of the women from childhood through adulthood. The game’s optional audio narration and interactive scroll design, gives children the power to learn at their own pace, and gain the agency to form new perspectives


  • Example
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Leesta is Answering the Need
for Digital Learning Resources

Our modules are designed to be versatile so that they can be used in after school programs, homes, and classrooms all across the country.

Homes

In our increasing technological world, children have endless access to games & apps, but parents are longing for resources that are not only fun but also educational.


Schools

Schools & after-school programs are shifting towards blended learning methods, that combine traditional teaching with new technologies. In 2000 only 45,00 k-12 students had access to online learning. By 2010 that number escalated to over 4 million.



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Revolutionary Education.
Inspired by Women.

Winners of the Social Innovation Challenge

DSC_8816 copy2

Sponsored by

DSC_8816 copy2

DSC_8816 copy2

At Leesta, we help children develop empathy and cultural competence by bringing women to the forefront of U.S. history education. Our team designs online interactive resources for 3rd-5th graders that engage them in new narratives of U.S. history — ones that are inspired by women!


The name Leesta is a phonetic play on the Spanish word “lista”, which means a smart or clever girl!




We are Creating High Quality
Supplementary Educational Materials

Our team is designing a set of modules. Each one will focus on the life of one woman but will tell a larger narrative of American history along the way. Each module will contain a short written bio, lesson plans, accompanying activities, and the game.

The Game

The main component of Leesta is a series of interactive timelines highlighting the lives of amazing women. The timelines will be more informative and engaging than a textbook. Teachers can use these as a supplementary teaching aids in classrooms, and children can use the site to learn at their own pace.


  • Example
  • Example
  • Example
  • Example





Leesta is Answering the Need
for Digital Learning Resources

Our modules are designed to be versatile so that they can be used in after school programs, homes, and classrooms all across the country.



Homes

In our increasing technological world, children have endless access to games & apps, but parents are longing for resources that are not only fun but also educational.




Schools

Schools & after-school programs are shifting towards blended learning methods, that combine traditional teaching with new technologies. In 2000 only 45,00 k-12 students had access to online learning. By 2010 that number escalated to over 4 million.